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  1. API reference
  2. Welcome
    1. Component overview
    2. Get Flexmonster
    3. Quick start
    4. System requirements
    5. Troubleshooting
    6. Managing license keys
    7. Migrating from WebDataRocks to Flexmonster
  3. Integration with frameworks
    1. Available tutorials
    2. Integration with Angular
    3. Integration with React
    4. Integration with Vue
    5. Other integrations
      1. Integration with Python
        1. Integration with Django
        2. Integration with Jupyter Notebook
      2. Integration with React Native
      3. Integration with AngularJS (v1.x)
      4. Integration with TypeScript
      5. Integration with R Shiny
      6. Integration with jQuery
      7. Integration with Ionic
      8. Integration with Electron.js
      9. Integration with Webpack
      10. Integration with RequireJS
  4. Connecting to Data Source
    1. Supported data sources
    2. JSON
      1. Connecting to JSON
      2. Connecting to JSON using Flexmonster Data Server
      3. Data types in JSON
    3. CSV
      1. Connecting to CSV
      2. Connecting to CSV using Flexmonster Data Server
      3. Data types in CSV
    4. Database
      1. Connecting to SQL databases
      2. Connecting to a MySQL database
      3. Connecting to a Microsoft SQL Server database
      4. Connecting to a PostgreSQL database
      5. Connecting to an Oracle database
      6. Connecting to other databases
    5. Flexmonster Data Server
      1. Getting started with Flexmonster Data Server
      2. Installation guide
      3. Configurations reference
      4. Data sources guide
      5. Security and authorization guide
      6. The Data Server as a DLL
        1. Getting started with the Data Server as a DLL
        2. Referring the Data Server as a DLL
        3. Implementing the API controller
        4. Implementing the server filter
        5. Implementing the custom parser
        6. DLL configurations reference
        7. The controller's methods for request handling
    6. MongoDB
      1. Introduction to Flexmonster MongoDB Connector
      2. Getting started with the MongoDB Connector
      3. Embedding the MongoDB Connector into the server
    7. Microsoft Analysis Services
      1. Connecting to Microsoft Analysis Services
      2. Getting started with Flexmonster Accelerator
      3. Referring the Accelerator as a DLL
      4. Configuring the authentication process
      5. Configuring a secure HTTPS connection
      6. Troubleshooting
    8. Custom data source API
      1. Introduction to the custom data source API
      2. A quick overview of a sample Node.js server
      3. A quick overview of a sample .NET Core server
      4. Implement your own server
        1. Implementing the custom data source API server
        2. Implementing filters
        3. Supporting more aggregation functions
        4. Returning data for the drill-through view
    9. Elasticsearch
      1. Connecting to Elasticsearch
      2. Configuring the mapping
    10. Pentaho Mondrian
      1. Connecting to Pentaho Mondrian
      2. Getting started with the Accelerator
      3. Configuring Mondrian roles
      4. Configuring username/password protection
      5. Configuring a secure HTTPS connection
      6. Troubleshooting
  5. Security
    1. Security in Flexmonster
    2. Security aspects of connecting to an OLAP cube
      1. Ways of connecting to an OLAP cube
      2. The data transfer process
      3. Data security
      4. Data access management
  6. Configuring report
    1. What is a report
    2. Data source
    3. Slice
    4. Options
    5. Mapping
    6. Number formatting
    7. Conditional formatting
    8. Set the report for the component
    9. Get the report from the component
    10. Date and time formatting
    11. Configuring global options
    12. Export and print
    13. Calculated values
    14. Custom sorting
  7. Charts
    1. Available tutorials
    2. Flexmonster Pivot Charts
    3. Integration with Highcharts
    4. Integration with amCharts
    5. Integration with Google Charts
    6. Integration with FusionCharts
    7. Integration with any charting library
  8. Customizing
    1. Customizing the Toolbar
    2. Customizing appearance
    3. Customizing the context menu
    4. Customizing the grid
    5. Customizing the pivot charts
    6. Localizing the component
  9. Updating to the latest version
    1. Updating to the latest version
    2. Release notes
    3. Migration guide from 2.7 to 2.8
    4. Migration guide from 2.6 to 2.7
    5. Migration guide from 2.5 to 2.6
    6. Migration guide from 2.4 to 2.5
    7. Migration guide from 2.3 to 2.4
    8. Migration guide from 2.2 to 2.3
    9. Documentation for older versions
  10. Flexmonster CLI Reference
    1. Overview
    2. Troubleshooting the CLI
    3. flexmonster create
    4. flexmonster add
    5. flexmonster update
    6. flexmonster version
    7. flexmonster help
Table of contents

Embedding the MongoDB Connector into the server

In our previous guide, we launched our sample GitHub project demonstrating the basics of using Flexmonster MongoDB Connector. The information from that guide is considered a prerequisite for this tutorial, it is highly recommended that you complete the previous guide before starting this one.

This tutorial describes how to embed the Connector into a server.

To fetch data from a database and pass it to the component, the Connector needs a mediator between itself and Flexmonster. Your server acts as this mediator and its task is to handle Flexmonster’s requests and to pass them to the Connector in the correct format. The server has to be configured properly to complete this task.

All requests have the type property in the request body. There are 4 types of requests that can be distinguished by the URL path and type value:

  • <url>/handshake (optional) – The first (handshake) request to establish a connection between the client and server.
  • <url>/fields – Request for all fields with their types (i.e., meta-object or schema).
  • <url>/members – Request for all members of a field.
  • <url>/select – Request for the data.

The value of type will always be the same as the endpoint name, e.g., when a request is sent to <url>/fields, the value of type is "fields".

The Connector has three methods to handle /fields, /members, and /select requests. See the documentation to learn more about these methods.

The following guide will walk you through the process of server configuration.

Step 1. Embed the component into your web page

If Flexmonster is not yet embedded, set up an empty component in your web page:

In pure JavaScript

Complete the Quick start guide. Your code should look similar to the following example:

var pivot = new Flexmonster({
    container: "pivotContainer",
    toolbar: true
});

In Angular

Complete the Integration with Angular guide. Your code should look similar to the following example:

<fm-pivot 
[toolbar]="true">
</fm-pivot>

In React

Complete the Integration with React guide. Your code should look similar to the following example:

<FlexmonsterReact.Pivot
toolbar={true}
/>

In Vue

Complete the Integration with Vue guide. Your code should look similar to the following example:

<Pivot
ref="pivot"
toolbar>
</Pivot>

In the next steps, we will start configuring the server.

Step 2. Create a simple server

Now we will focus on the server part of our project. 

First, let’s create a simple server using Express.js. If you already have a server, jump to Step 3. Create a separate module for the request routing.

Follow the steps below to get a simple server application:

Step 1. Create a folder for the server and run the npm init command there to generate the package.json file.

Step 2. The server needs the express, cors, and body-parser packages. Install them with npm:

Install Express.js

npm install express

Install CORS

npm install cors

Install body parser

npm install body-parser

Step 3. Then, create a simple server in a .js file (e.g., server.js):

const express = require("express");
var cors = require('cors');
var bodyParser = require('body-parser');

const app = express();

app.use(cors());
app.use(bodyParser.json());

var port = 9204;
app.listen(port, () => {
console.log(Example app listening at http://localhost:${port})
});

Step 3. Create a separate module for the request routing

All the request routing will be implemented in a separate .js file (e.g., mongo.js).

At this step, include the .js file (i.e., mongo.js) into your server. All the requests coming to <url> will be handled by this separate module (in this case, the <url>/mongo path is used):

app.use('/mongo', require('./mongo.js'));

Now, all the requests sent to <url> (in this case,<url>/mongo) will be processed by the mongo module.

However, since we haven’t yet defined the mongo.js file properly, the code won’t work just yet.

Note: If Flexmonster Pivot Table is running on a different server, enable CORS.

Step 4. Install packages for the mongo.js module

Install Flexmonster MongoDB Connector and the MongoDB driver:

npm install flexmonster-mongo-connector
npm install mongodb

Now it’s time to configure the mongo.js module.

Step 5. Configure the mongo.js module

Configure the mongo.js module in three steps:

Step 1. In the JavaScript file mentioned in the previous step (i.e., mongo.js), include the following libraries:

const mongo = require('express').Router();
const mongodb = require("mongodb");
const fm_mongo_connector = require("flexmonster-mongo-connector");

Step 2. Then set up a connection with your MongoDB database and define the Connector:

let dbo = null;
let _apiReference = null; // it’ll be the Connector instance

mongodb.MongoClient.connect("mongodb://read:only@olap.flexmonster.com:27017", {
useNewUrlParser: true
}, (err, db) => {
    if (err)
        throw err;
    dbo = db.db("flexmonster");
    _apiReference = new fm_mongo_connector.MongoDataAPI();
});

Step 3. Export the mongo module so the server can use it:

// requests handling functions will appear here
module.exports = mongo;

This module can now connect to your MongoDB database, but it does not handle the Flexmonster Pivot requests. In the next steps, we will handle all Flexmonster requests.

Step 6. (optional) Handle the /handshake request

This step is optional as it describes the handling of a /handshake request, which is also optional. Flexmonster will proceed to the next request even if the server does not handle it.

The /handshake request establishes a connection between the client and server. If the server sends the implemented version of the custom data source API in response to the /handshake request, the client can check whether the server and the client implement the same version of the custom data source API.

To receive notifications about version compatibility, the /handshake request can be handled like this:

mongo.post("/handshake", async (req, res) => {
    try {
       res.json({ version: _apiReference.API_VERSION });
    } catch (err) {
        handleError(err, res);
    }
});

Step 7. Handle the /fields request

The next request that needs to be handled is a /fields request; it is sent to <url>/fields. It can be handled like this:

mongo.post("/fields", async (req, res) => {
try {
const result = await _apiReference.getSchema(dbo, req.body.index);
res.json(result);
} catch (err) {
//your error handler
}
});

When Flexmonster Pivot successfully receives a response to the /fields request, it shows the Field List with all of the available fields.

To learn more about the getSchema method, see our documentation.

Step 8. Handle the /members request

The next request to handle is the request for the field’s members that is sent to <url>/members. It can be handled like this:

mongo.post("/members", async (req, res) => {
try {
const result = await _apiReference.getMembers(
dbo, req.body.index, req.body.field,
{ page: req.body.page, pageToken: req.body.pageToken });
res.json(result);
} catch (err) {
//your error handler
}
});

When Flexmonster Pivot successfully receives the response to this request, you will be able to select a string field for rows or for columns and retrieve its members.

To learn more about the getMembers method, see our documentation.

Step 9. Handle the /select request

When a field is selected for rows and/or columns and a numeric field is selected for measures in the Field List, the /select request is sent to the endpoint <url>/select. It can be handled like this:

mongo.post("/select", async (req, res) => {
try {
const result = await _apiReference.getSelectResult(
dbo, req.body.index, req.body.query,
{ page: req.body.page, pageToken: req.body.pageToken });
res.json(result);
} catch (err) {
//your error handler
}
});

When Flexmonster successfully receives the response to this kind of /select request, a pivot table with the received data is shown.

To learn more about the getSelectResult method, see our documentation.

Step 10. Run the server

Run your server with the following command:

node server.js

Step 11. Configure the report

Now it’s time to configure the pivot table on the web page. In report.dataSource, define these parameters to connect to your server:

var pivot = new Flexmonster({
   container: "pivotContainer",
   toolbar: true,
   report: {
    dataSource: {
      type: "api",
          url: "<url>",
          index: "your-collection-name"
  }
}

});

Here, url is the path to your API endpoints (e.g., "http://localhost:9204/mongo"), and index is your collection’s name. index will be sent with every request.

Open your HTML page in the browser to see the result – the pivot table with data from your MongoDB database is shown.

What’s next?